Shopping around for insurance with a poor driving record isn’t always easy. Sometimes, you will have to contact multiple insurance companies before one of them takes you on as a client. When you have a bad driving record, insurance companies realize that this means you are a higher risk to insure. Due to this reason, you can expect to have higher priced insurance policies. In fact, some insurance companies might deny offering you coverage altogether. Car insurance companies have the right to deny people they consider to be high-risk drivers. The worse your record is, for this reason, the harder it is going to be for you to get an auto insurance company.

What Defines a Bad Driving Record?

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There is not one specific thing that describes a bad driving record. Insurance companies have their own standards for choosing clients to insure. Some companies are willing to take on higher risk than others. The more tickets you have and the more accidents that you get into, the worse your driving record will be. However, a bad driving record usually has more than one driving infraction on it. Usually, insurance companies consider bad driving records to have two or more at fault accidents and two or more tickets. Usually, the more demerit points you have, the worse of a driving record you will have. The worse of a driving record you have, the harder of the time you’re going to have picking up an insurance company.

How Can I Lower My Car Insurance Premium after an Accident?

When you already have a bad drivers record and get into an accident, you might have a tough time getting cheap insurance. Sometimes, your insurance company might even decide to drop you as a client. In order to do this, your insurance company would need to send you a notice. During this time, you have time to shop around for a new insurance company. To lower your car insurance premium, whether your company keeps you on as a client or not, you’re going to have to do some work. Asking for things like higher deductibles, lowering your car insurance coverage, bundling your house and automobile insurance and making sure that you maintain good credit are key ways you can help to keep your insurance premiums reasonable.

If Someone Else Got Into An Accident In My Vehicle, Will My Insurance Go Up?

Having someone else get into an accident in your vehicle is almost as bad as getting into the accident yourself. When someone crashes while driving your vehicle, whether you are driving or not, your insurance company still has to pay out to fix your vehicle. It is also likely going to be your liability coverage from your insurance policy that pays out if the damage is done to another person or their property. Due to this reason, you should definitely be careful about who you let drive your vehicle.

How Much Can a Bad Driving Record Affect My Insurance?

A bad driving record can have a pretty substantial influence on your insurance rates. Minor ticket violations usually have very little impact on your insurance rates. However, subsequent tickets will likely increase your insurance premium anywhere from 3 to 10%. Additional tickets, after having two on your driver’s record, will likely result in additional 5 to 10% increases in your insurance rates. The most substantial changes to your insurance premium come when you get a major ticket. Things like high-speed driving, impaired driving etc. Usually, result in the highest penalties. Generally, when a major ticket is given, you can expect an increase anywhere from 10% to 50%. The more dangerous of a driving infraction you committed, the higher your rates will be.

What Is Insurance from the Facility Association?

When you cannot get insurance from regular insurance providers, you can contact the facility Association. This business is in place to cover drivers who are refused coverage from regular insurance companies. Usually, you can get some insurance company to cover you. However, if you have an extremely bad driving record, you might have to contact the facility Association. Unfortunately, the facility Association has some of the highest priced insurance policies in the insurance industry. However, you will not be denied auto insurance coverage so long as you are an eligible driver.

How Long Before An Accident Is Removed From Your Record?

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When an accident occurs, unfortunately, you will have the accident on your driver’s record for a period of six years. The only good thing about this is that insurance companies normally do not adjust insurance policies until your current policy is over. Depending on how long your policy is, this could give you up to one year’s time of cheaper car insurance premiums. So, instead of paying six years of more expensive car insurance, you might only have to pay for five years.

What Happens After A Car Accident That Is Not Your Fault?

car accident

After a car accident that is not your fault, you are going to have to pay an insurance deductible to fix your vehicle. Sometimes after a vehicle accident that wasn’t your fault, your insurance company might pursue the other driver’s insurance company to recover lost funds. When this occurs and your insurance company gets money back from the other driver’s insurance company, you should be reimbursed for your deductible. However, if your insurance company decides not to pursue action against the other driver’s insurance company, you will have to pay the full amount of your insurance deductible. The only thing that you can do, in this case, is take the other driver to Small Claims Court and attempt to reimburse yourself for the costs that way.

To Conclude

No one wishes to have a bad car insurance record. It is just something that happens to people. We all make mistakes and, unfortunately, when we make mistakes with our vehicles, we have to pay for it. Some insurance companies might not take you on if you have a bad driving record. However, if you shop around enough, you should be able to find an insurance company to take you on. Whenever you have a bad driving record, you should always try to improve it. Although things take a while to come off of your record, the longer something is in the past, the more likely it is that your insurance company will ignore it.